The Official Klout Blog

5 Ways to Learn From Your Klout Report

July 23rd, 2010 by Megan Berry
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So you’re looking at your Klout Report and you’re thinking — well that’s cool, but how can I use this information? After all just knowing what your Klout Score is, absent any context, isn’t that helpful. So when looking at your report here are some things to keep in mind:

1. Look at all the scores. People often focus only on the Klout Score, but looking at your True Reach, Amplification, and Network (see them on the score analysis tab) can help you understand where you’re excelling and where you might have room for improvement. To understand more about the difference between these scores, read about how they’re scored.

2. Compare your report with those of people in your network. Look at the reports of people who you consider peers, people who you look up to and people who are just staring on Twitter. Look at their scores, achievements, classification, and content. Pay attention to where you are similar to these people and where you differ. Compare that to what you know about their tweeting and interaction style and you may begin to get idea of how you could improve and what you’re doing right.

3. Watch how your report changes over time. Pay attention to how your Klout Score (and accompanying scores) change over time. What are you doing that causes increases or decreases? (Hint: It’s not really about what you’re doing, but about how the people in your network react). What else is changing in your report? Changing influencers or class may indicate you’re interacting differently. Note: You can update your report by clicking the refresh score button on the lower right of your report (you have to be logged in).

4. Don’t forget about Klout class. Your Klout classification indicates your influence style and should give you a powerful idea of how you fit into the ecosystem. Take a look at your class and the ones near you and see why you got placed where you are. Is that the class you’d like to be in? No class is inherently better than any other, but some may be better for the goals you want to achieve.

5. Learn from your top content. On the content analysis tab you can see topics you are most influential on, top retweets, and top links. Is there any sort of theme among your top content? For instance, maybe people retweet you more when you use links or when you discuss a certain topic. Note that the topic summary shows the topics you are most influential on, not just the topics you tweet about most (i.e. the topics people engage with you on the most).

This list could certainly have been much longer so if you have any suggestions on how you use your Klout Report, please let us know!

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Megan Berry

Marketing Manager for Klout

Latest posts by Megan Berry (see all)

This entry was posted on Friday, July 23rd, 2010 at 10:49 am and is filed under measuring influence, social media. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

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